CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honors Jaybird Tarah Pro


Share this :   | | |
CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honors Jaybird Tarah Pro

With CES 2019 on the horizon, we’re excited to share that Jaybird Tarah Pro has been chosen as a CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honoree.

 

This award celebrates outstanding product design and engineering – both of which are always top of mind for our headphones. Our products are built by runners for runners and designed to deliver when it matters most. And, Tarah Pro does just that.

 

The Tarah Pro design is inspired by the extreme demands athletes face during endurance adventures and ultra distances. Our engineers focused on a lightweight design that is extremely durable and weatherproof, while also providing a comfortable, secure fit. With the industry-leading 14-hour battery life, we worked closely with our athletes to ensure that Tarah Pro delivers long-term comfort and security.

 

We’re honored that the CTA community has awarded us, and our goal is to continue designing innovative products with smart design and engineering that help fit your lifestyle, whether that means running on your local city street, tackling long mountain trails or anything between.

 

The Nordic Journey: Becoming An Olympian & Saying Goodbye to Pyeongchang


Share this :   | | |
The Nordic Journey: Becoming An Olympian & Saying Goodbye to Pyeongchang

Ben Berand is a 22 year old Nordic Combined Athlete with one pursuit, to fulfill his potential in the sport he loves. He grew up pursuing this dream from the small town of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. He now pursues this dream from Park City, Utah where he has the opportunity to train with some of the best skiers in the world. Together they strive to show the world what USA Nordic Combined is all about. 
 


 

I’m on an airplane flying away from the Olympics – moving fast yet thinking very slowly. Some experiences in life need contemplation and this is surely one of them. It’s funny, I have dreamed of competing in the Olympics my entire life, but I actually showed up to South Korea totally unaware of what to expect. I believe I can speak for my teammates Jasper Good and Ben Loomis (First time Olympians) when I say we were totally mentally unprepared. We got to spend the first couple days figuring out the busy schedule, lay of the land, bus departure times, and just how difficult homework is to accomplish at the games. It was extremely helpful having some experience on the team with Bryan and Taylor. I remember Bryan telling me his key to the Olympics, “It’s easy to fall into the trap of constantly rushing around because there is so much going on. The trick though – move slowly, execute on what you need to get done, and never rush yourself at the expense of that.” Great words to live by, Olympics or not.
 

We’ve had to overcome a lot over the years. USA Nordic has not gotten here the easy way. I think being the underdogs is a mentality that suits us well. When I look around at all the other teams, I wouldn’t trade this one for the world. This group of girls and guys is incredible. The pride I felt watching them compete and putting that bib on with them was overpowering.
 


Once the bib is on, it’s the same game. Even though the stage is different, there is still a ski jump – the point is still to go as far as possible. There is still a race course – the point is to kill yourself. From the outside looking in, it all seems so big but I can speak for the entire USA Nordic Team when I say, we knew exactly what we needed to do once the moment came. We left it all out there and hopefully gave people something to cheer for, something to be inspired by.
 

I will also always remember those last four days in Pyeongchang with my USA Nordic teammates. We were done competing and had the freedom to do whatever we wanted. I think the fun we had together as a group felt so sweet because we’ve all had our heads down and heels dug in for a long while. We dressed like goons and went alpine skiing up on the Yong Pong Resort. Will Rhoads came up with the brilliant idea of trying snowboarding for the first time – so Kevin Bickner and I decided to join him on this pursuit. We traveled to the coast, walked the beach, set off fireworks, and took in the sights. We attended hockey games, curling matches, and Mike Glasder was on a celeb fest meeting Dale Earnhardt Jr and watching Big Air with Melania Trump. Long story short, we totally crushed it. During the season it’s very rare to get Ski Jumping and Nordic Combined together for very long. Getting three weeks together was a truly memorable experience that I feel has bonded us all for life. As if we weren’t bonded enough by our ROTC Death Training Camp last spring (more on that another time). It has also made me decide we need to do some more training camps together during the season.
 


 

Lastly, I just want to give a cheers to Abby Hughes and Bryan Fletcher. They just competed in their last Olympics ever. Bryan, you are the man. I will never be able to repay you for everything you have given to me over the last couple years. You have taught me so much. Yes, we are all athletes and our job is to perform, but more importantly, our job is to be good people and give back. I think that nobody gives back quite the way you do, and I want to thank you for that. Cheers to an awesome career.
 

Olympic Stats with USA Nordic
 
Best finish for Men’s Ski Jumping:
18th- Kevin Bickner
 
Best finish for Women’s Ski Jumping:
19th- Sarah Hendrickson
 
Best finish for Nordic Combined:
17th- Bryan Fletcher
 
Olympic Awards with USA Nordic
 
Most forgetful: Kevin Bickner

Kevin actually forgot to bring his equipment to the competition the day he finished 18th (the best American finish in ski jumping in a long time). Ben Loomis had to hop on a bus and bring his equipment to him. Kevin also lost his opening ceremonies coat and credentials. To be honest, he was probably overwhelmed with his new found fame. Kevin is HUGE in Korea right now.
 
Best dressed: Ben Loomis

Even though we were all wearing the same clothing, Ben Loomis still found a way to stand out from the crowd – per usual
 
DJ of the games: Bryan Fletcher

Bryan had some pretty fire playlists going in the changing room. Not bad for an old dude.
 
Dad of the games: Bryan Fletcher
 
Most famous: Casey Larson
Casey became famous when some Olympic historian decided he was the 100,000th man to compete in the Olympic games. Some may think this was random luck, but he knew exactly what he was doing.
 
Best jokes: Will Rhoads
 
Cupid: Casey Larson
He truly fell in love with every girl he laid his eyes on.
 
Team Planner: Jasper Good
Jasper is amazing at plans. I just follow him and know I’m going where I need to go at the right time.
 
The guy who pretends to know about aerials: Taylor Fletcher
Taylor Fletcher got to share the experience of the Olympics with his girlfriend Kiley McKinnon (Aerial skier). How cool is that?

The Nordic Journey: Catching Up With Bryan Fletcher of USA Nordic


Share this :   | | |
The Nordic Journey: Catching Up With Bryan Fletcher of USA Nordic

Bryan Fletcher is a childhood cancer survivor who fell in love with Nordic Combined at a young age. “Like most professional athletes the itch to find out what I am made of is what drives me today. I love learning new things about myself with each competition season that passes. I am humbled by what I have shown to myself I can accomplish thus far and I can’t wait to see how far that goes in the future.”
 

 
We were lucky enough to catch some time with USA Nordic athlete, Bryan Fletcher, between family time, training, and studying.

 

How did you get into Nordic skiing/jumping?

As a child, I loved the thrill of flying through the air and jumping off things. So, while undergoing chemo, as a distraction from that part of my life, my parents signed me up for a learn to ski jump demo day. I was hooked from the first jump and that same day was enrolled in the program. That was the beginning of my quest to see how far I could take the sport.
 
Tell us about a day in the life:

Right now, I am a full-time athlete, dad, husband, and student. I co-founded a charity called ccThrive which I also work on part-time. A typical day consists of family and training obligations first, followed by school. After my career in Nordic Combined, I hope to pursue a career as a physician assistant.
 

How do you balance your personal life with all the demands of being a world-class athlete?

It’s challenging but one thing that helps is turning your training sessions into stress relief sessions. Being outside, jumping or working on endurance in any form (biking, running, cross-country skiing, backcountry skiing, hiking etc) is when my head is the clearest and my priorities are in focus. This clarity helps me make a plan of action as to how I will accomplish and balance all the tasks at hand.
 
What is your training regimen like?

Finding perfection in two sports is extremely challenging. Training for Nordic Combined requires both endurance and explosive power focuses. That means that nearly every day will have both endurance focused workouts and weight and plyometric focused workouts. Those two physical traits do not like to be balanced so finding the right balance of training for each individual is what our training regimen is like. For me personally, it’s a yearly 60/40 split between endurance and jumping specific training which amounts to nearly 1000 hours a year.
 
How do you keep your body in shape during the off season?

Our competition season runs from Nov to March but the bulk of the training is done in April-Nov. So after the season wraps up mid-march I usually take two weeks off to enjoy as much backcountry skiing as possible and come April 1st it’s back to the plan. However, at this point in the season, I love to mix it up with road biking, running, and backcountry skiing as much as possible.
 

What is your favorite aspect of being on the USA Nordic Team?

The community, our sport has an amazing community surrounding it. From the athletes to the coaches and fans, being on this team is unique. Everyone is involved for life and the love and support is endless. I couldn’t ask for a better family to be a part of.
 
Dogs or cats? Dogs
 
Tinder or Bumble? What are those?
 
Sunrise or Sunset? Both, I love to be up early and enjoy the sunrise from the great wide-open but I also love to be home in time for that sunset BBQ with family and friends!
 
Check out Bryan’s flavor of the week:

 

Keep in touch with Bryan!

The Nordic Journey: Catching Up With Tara Geraghty-Moats of USA Nordic


Share this :   | | |
The Nordic Journey: Catching Up With Tara Geraghty-Moats of USA Nordic

Tara Geraghty-Moats started jumping when she was 9 years old and was named to the Visa Development Team by 15. When she was 16 she suffered two knee injuries. After being told by doctors that she would never ski jump again, she took four years off to do biathlon (cross-country skiing and rifle shooting) and Nordic ski racing. She was a student at a winter sports school in Sweden called the Sollefteå Skidgymnasium where she studied biathlon in 2012-2013. During her time there she earned a National title for biathlon. Tara is a multi-time medalist in Junior Nationals for cross-country skiing and was on the biathlon Junior World Championship Team and Junior National Team from 2011-2014. She mountain bikes and trail runs in the summer, tele-skis in the spring, and enjoys spending time in the Vermont woods.

 

 

We caught up with USA Nordic athlete, Tara Geraghty-Moats, in the midst of competition season to find out how she got into the sport and how she maintains a high-performance lifestyle.
 
How did you get in to nordic skiing/jumping?

My mom was sick of me jumping off furniture so she signed me up for ski jumping. Then she thought I needed to burn more energy, so she also signed me up for cross-country skiing.
 
Tell us about a day in the life:

I live in a really small town in Vermont that has one paved road and no stoplights. I work on a vegetable farm that supplies a lot of the local restaurants and food coops. I babysit and also work in a ski and bike shop, and I coach junior skiing when I can. Sometimes when I’m home I work 60h weeks, sometimes 20hrs. It’s all about balance, and I love being outside – any day, all day.
 
How do you balance your personal life with all the demands of being a world-class athlete?

It’s tough. I try to be good friends with my teammates but also stay in touch with the people back home, like my boyfriend. In reality it doesn’t always work out that well with crazy schedules and different time zones. Sometimes it’s best to just live in the moment and relate to the people around me.
 
How do you stay focused during the off season?

Ahh..what off season? In the month we have off, I try to ski as much as possible. So ya, in my break from skiing I go skiing. I may me a little obsessed.
 
What is your favorite aspect of being on the USA Nordic Team?

Traveling the world, getting to live my dream, trying to be a better athlete every single day, and having the support to achieve that.
 
Dogs or cats? Both
 
Tinder or Bumble? I guess Tinder because I don’t know what Bumble is, but I think I prefer that spending time with friends I already have thing.
 
Sunrise or Sunset? Both and as many as possible.
 

 

Check out Tara’s flavor of the week:

 

 

Keep in touch with Tara!

Seasonal Switch in the Sierras with Andrew Miller


Share this :   | | |
Seasonal Switch in the Sierras with Andrew Miller

Andrew Miller is an accomplished photographer, adventurer and creative director focusing most of his work in winter climates exploring and chasing storms usually with a snowboard under his feet. From the Andes, Alps, Interior B.C. to the West Fjords of Iceland and high peaks of the Himalayas his award winning images has taken him to remote mountain ranges across the globe while working with a vast range of clients and editorial titles worldwide.  From the skin track, helipad to the resort lift and sled trail Andrew has been out there creating his work and quickly establishing himself as one of the most well-rounded photographers in the snow industry.

 

The​ ​seasonal​ ​switch​ ​always​ ​can​ ​bring​ ​a​ ​little​ ​mixed​ ​feelings.​ ​​ ​At​ ​first​ ​it​ ​can​ ​be​ ​hard​ ​to​ ​trade running​ ​shoes​ ​for​ ​winter​ ​boots,​ ​tee​ ​shirts​ ​for​ ​big​ ​jackets,​ ​and​ ​losing​ ​an​ ​hour​ ​of​ ​daylight​ ​doesn’t help​ ​the​ ​already​ ​short​ ​window​ ​for​ ​activities​ ​outside.​ ​​ ​In​ ​the​ ​High​ ​Sierra​ ​the​ ​transition​ ​from​ ​fall​ ​to winter​ ​can​ ​literally​ ​happen​ ​overnight.​ ​​ ​One​ ​day​ ​you’re​ ​trail​ ​running​ ​and​ ​the​ ​next​ ​day​ ​you’re​ ​putting skins​ ​on​ ​your​ ​splitboard​ ​for​ ​your​ ​first​ ​tour​ ​of​ ​the​ ​season.​ ​It’s​ ​not​ ​uncommon​ ​to​ ​see​ ​multiple​ ​feet of​ ​snow​ ​fall​ ​in​ ​twenty four​ ​hours.​ ​Our​ ​daily​ ​routine​ ​now​ ​revolves​ ​around​ ​condition​ ​reports, weather​ ​forecasts​ ​and​ ​the​ ​constant​ ​search​ ​for​ ​the​ ​next​ ​new​ ​area​ ​to​ ​explore​ ​and​ ​ride.​ ​Until spring​ ​there​ ​really​ ​is​ ​no​ ​looking​ ​back.​ ​​ ​Every​ ​month​ ​the​ ​snowpack​ ​gets​ ​deeper,​ ​your​ ​legs stronger​ ​and​ ​endurance​ ​builds,​ ​powering​ ​the​ ​passion​ ​to​ ​get​ ​outside​ ​everyday​ ​to​ ​chase​ ​that​ ​next adventure.  

 

Chasing​ ​the​ ​light​ ​to​ ​stay​ ​warm​ ​on​ ​a​ ​chilly​ ​November​ ​day​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Eastern​ ​Sierra.

 

Crisp​ ​air,​ ​cold​ ​temps,​ ​empty​ ​trails​ ​and​ ​a​ ​storm​ ​on​ ​the​ ​horizon.​ ​Perfect​ ​combo​ ​for​ ​a​ ​good run!

 

Getting​ ​in​ ​one​ ​last​ ​run​ ​with​ ​the​ ​pups​ ​on​ ​your​ ​favorite​ ​trail​ ​before​ ​everything​ ​turns​ ​white​ ​for the​ ​next​ ​6​ ​months.

 

 

​​Putting​ ​the​ ​Jaybird​ ​RUN​ ​batteries​ ​to​ ​the​ ​test​ ​in​ ​cold​ ​windy​ ​temps.

 

With​ ​almost​ ​six​ ​feet​ ​of​ ​snow​ ​over​ ​two​ ​days​ ​the​ ​Eastern​ ​Sierra​ ​winter​ ​season​ ​is​ ​off​ ​to​ ​an early​ ​start.  

 

When​ ​your​ ​go​ ​to​ ​summer​ ​single​ ​track​ ​turns​ ​into​ ​the​ ​your​ ​go​ ​to​ ​winter​ ​skin​ ​trail.

 

Early​ ​mornings​ ​and​ ​long​ ​days​ ​in​ ​the​ ​mountains​ ​with​ ​the​ ​new​ ​Jaybird​ ​RUN​ ​holding​ ​its​ ​own​ ​in the​ ​snowy​ ​conditions.

 

​​First​ ​line​ ​of​ ​the​ ​season​ ​is​ ​always​ ​a​ ​little​ ​nerve​ ​racking​ ​but​ ​once​ ​you​ ​have​ ​made​ ​that​ ​first turn​ ​it​ ​all​ ​comes​ ​rushing​ ​back.

 

​​It’s​ ​always​ ​a​ ​good​ ​day​ ​when​ ​you​ ​see​ ​the​ ​sunrise​ ​and​ ​set​ ​in​ ​the​ ​mountains.

 

Classic​ ​Eastern​ ​Sierra​ ​color​ ​palette,​ ​a​ ​sign​ ​of​ ​good​ ​things​ ​to​ ​come!  

12 Days of Christmas


Share this :   | | |
12 Days of Christmas

We feel really lucky to have a loyal community stoking our passion everyday, and we want to celebrate you this Christmas season with our 12 Days of Christmas giveaway! 12 Days of Christmas is a special giveaway where we’ll be giving away a pair of buds (X3, FREEDOM 2, or RUN chosen at random) daily during the 12 days leading up to Christmas.

 

 

All you need to do is hashtag #12daysofjaybird on your running photos on Instagram. We’ll choose a winner each day beginning December 13th until Christmas Eve. We hope you keep using music as a tool to get you out the door on the crisp days ahead. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!
 
To Enter:
-Follow @jaybirdsport on Instagram

-Hashtag #12daysofjaybird on your running photos on Instagram

-Have fun and get psyched for the holidays!

 

“I enjoy how winter makes you change things up. You need to embrace the slog fest, put on some winter traction (I like micro-spikes) and breath in that fresh mountain air.” – Timothy Olson, Jaybird Athlete

 

“The Holidays are always full of hustle and bustle, I love running during this time of year as a way to slow down my mind and reflect on the things that are most important; family, friends, health, and gratitude.” – Luke Nelson, Jaybird Athlete

 

“While the holidays can be some of the best times of the year, they can also be very stressful. The combo of sitting around more and stuffing my face w/ holiday treats can lead me to feeling less than stellar physically and mentally. That’s why I love to get out in the fresh air for a run. Best way to clear my mind, and work off all those rich holiday foods. Running during the holidays also benefits my family as I’m much more pleasant to be around after I’ve gotten my ya-yas out!” – Rory Bosio, Jaybird Athlete

This Is Why I Run – Sil Pimentel


Share this :   | | |
This Is Why I Run – Sil Pimentel

My name is Silas Efraim Bezerra de Araújo Pimentel, but most people know me as Sil. I’m originally from the beautiful coast of Natal, Brazil. I moved to the U.S. when I was 13 and this is where my appreciation for running really began. Running has played a big part in shaping who I am as an athlete, but more importantly as a person. My journey has been one of blood, sweat, and tears, but I wouldn’t want it any other way. My progression within track and field has taken me from racing my friends in the streets of Brazil to competing against some of the best in the world.

 

 
 

“There are 3 things that every athlete must understand in order to see success in their sport”

 

Running has always been a part of my life. One of my favorite childhood memories was waking up to the smell of my favorite black coffee and crackers for breakfast, and running around at the sand dunes near my home. After moving to the U.S. I was recruited by a PE coach to run track, and this is where it all started. I was able to attain a full-ride scholarship to Utah State University for track and field, where I graduated with honors, which led me to where I am today at the University of Utah pursuing a doctorate in physical therapy while starting my own business.
 

 

Coach Tony. When it comes to hard work and dedication, there is no better father figure and role model.
 

I consider my raw talent to be a gift from God. That is a gift I have treasured and worked countless hours to develop into the runner I am today.

 

“9:00 PM Sleep and dream about food”

 

There are 3 things that every athlete must understand in order to see success in their sport: 

-Time management

-Training

-Nutrition

 

 

Time Management

Life sometimes can get very busy and crazy, believe me, I know. Every once in awhile I get home from a long day and think to myself, “I’m too tired, and since it’s pre-season training I could easily skip today…” What helps me overcome these types of thoughts is scheduling my workouts into each day. This is what a typical day looks like:

“Invent yourself and then reinvent yourself, don’t swim in the same slough. Invent yourself and then reinvent yourself and stay out of the clutches of mediocrity… it is your life and its history and the present belong only to you.” Charles Bukowski.

-4:50 AM Get up and eat

-5:30 AM Coach the newbies and eat

-7:00 AM Physical Therapy School and eat, eat, eat

-3:00 PM Coach the newbies, and eat

-4:00 PM Run and eat

-5:30 PM Lift and eat

-6:50 PM Dinner/Study/Social Life

-9:00 PM Sleep and dream about food

 

This is how I structure my day-to-day, but I also make sure to have a good life balance, which includes time for a social life and some leisurely travels.

 

 

“When these types of days come at me, I just grab my RUNs or X3 earbuds and focus on the task at hand.”

 

When life gets crazy and I have to workout on my own, I can always count on my dog (also named Tony) to be my training buddy.

 

Training

One of the biggest reason for my success is the trust I have in my coach. At times it can be tough coming to track practice after a long day of performing clinical work, and your coach asks you to pull 5×300 meters at 40.5 seconds out of your already exhausted legs. However, because I trust him and his philosophy, I make it happen. Music has been very influential in my life. When these types of days come at me, I just grab my RUNs or X3 earbuds and focus on the task at hand.

 

A preseason week of training for me may look like this:

Monday – 10×60 @ 80% with 80% HR Recovery

Tuesday – 3×150 @ 90% with 80% HR Recovery

Wednesday – 20×200 @ 30.80 with 1:48 minutes rest

Thursday – 4×300 @ 40.5 with 4:18 minutes rest

Friday – 5:20 mile, 4×60 meter springs, and drills

Saturday – Block starts

Sunday – An easy bike ride (my favorite low impact workout) or a 60 minute walk

 

All of my workouts are planned for me to peak at a specific time, and trust is a must in order for me to see success. People often don’t see the road, only the results, and this is what the road looks like… painful!

 

 

“…just like training, you eat for your sport.”

 

 

Nutrition

Running can be considered my number one passion in life, with food coming in as a close second – A VERY close second. I really, really like food. I have learned that there is more to food than meets the eye. When I first started down this path in college I tried to eat very healthy with a very high fruits and vegetable diet, and even though I was excelling, I now know I was not my best. In college I was probably not eating more than 2400 calories a day, and now with help from professionals I consume around 3800 calories a day. Since this change, I have improved in all of my events. I often get sick of eating, but just like training, you eat for your sport.

 

We all have gifts, find yours and work to develop it. There is a quote by St. Jerome that goes, “Good, better, best. Never let it rest. ‘Til your good is better and your better is best”, so be your best and do what it takes to power your passion!
 
These songs are the power songs that I intertwine with my playlists in order to fuel my mind as I destroy my workouts:
 

 
We also want to hear your stories. Share your motivation for running in a short story and hashtag #whyirunjaybird on Instagram for a chance to win weekly prizes including earbuds and a chance to be featured on our social channels. We’re inspired by every type of runner, so don’t hesitate to share your passion with us. To the parent that wakes up early before sending their kids off to school, the beginner seeking to finish their first 5k, and the marathoner looking to set a new PR, your passion inspires more people than you’ll ever know. Share your stories with us and #runwild. Find more info about the This Is Why I Run series here.

 

Keep in touch with Sil!

 

 

 

 

This Is Why I Run – Jennifer Kyle


Share this :   | | |
This Is Why I Run – Jennifer Kyle

I’m so excited to be back on the Jaybird blog again! You may have read my previous post talking about food & running here. For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Jennifer Kyle – or JBird, as my family calls me. I live in Marin County, California, and I love to run and train for various races. I mostly do half and full marathons, though I’m getting excited to test my legs out on some shorter distances this year.

 

 

When I first started running, I spent a lot of time on the treadmill. This had a lot to do with safety for early morning runs – I didn’t want to run on dark roads. And I still believe that training on the treadmill can be a very effective tool. But I quickly learned that I had to reserve my long runs on the weekends for outside, so I could feel confident on race day.

 

All that said, I felt a bit sheepish after having lived in Marin for over a year – I didn’t quite know where to go to run 20 miles.  So before we get into my favorite long distance runs in the Bay Area, I wanted to share my tips for finding your own routes in your area or even when traveling:  

 

 

  1. Local running or biking store: Find your people! The folks who work at these stores usually do these sports themselves, and they can be a fantastic help when you are looking for a route. A track that is open to the public at 7am, a hilly route with water fountains, or the best route for views.
  2. Apps: MapMyRun, Strava, and even your phone’s maps app can be your friend. You can look for a route there, or even build your own by distance. One of my favorite things to do when in a new city is pick a landmark and run to it. Because photos ops – duh.
  3. Hotel concierges: Most concierges will have a recommendation of at least one or two loops or routes near the hotel. Don’t be afraid to put a copy of their map in your pocket. No shame.
  4. Internet search: Some of my favorite searches are “running bloggers ‘x’ city” or “running routes ‘x’ city.” This is also helpful when talking to a local running store or hotel concierge, because it gives them a place to start. For example, “What do you think of the Cherry Creek Trail?” Travel websites also have forums where you can search for keywords like “safety”, “10 miles”, etc.

Ok – now the really important part. The best long distance runs in the Bay Area! This area offers some of the most beautiful views and runs in the world. It is also known for its hills, so make sure you bring your climbing legs with you. If you get the chance, running here is a must! These are just a few of my favorites in the area. There are infinite possibilities and I’d love to hear your favorites in the comments below.

 

 

  1. Marin Headlands: This route is about 8.5 miles of some of the most spectacular views in the Bay Area. I especially like this run because it is easy to get to but feels like you’re so far removed from the city.
  2. Sausalito to AT&T Park: This was my favorite route when I trained for my first half marathon. You can start in Sausalito by taking the ferry there, or driving your car to the Vista Point viewing area on the North side of the Golden Gate Bridge. From there, you run over the bridge and down into the city through the financial district and along the Embarcadero. When you’ve reached AT&T stadium, you can turn around and do it all over again. This can get you 14-16 miles, depending on where you turn around. You also have the option of taking the ferry back to Sausalito from the Embarcadero Ferry building.
  3. Dipsea: This is a famous route in Mill Valley, CA. It is 7.4 miles from Mill Valley to Stinson Beach. A Dipsea Double would be doing the course out and back – clever name, I know. You can actually run the Dipsea Race if you are in the area the second Saturday in June. Known for its gnarly elevation gain, narrow trail and steep stairs – this route is quite a doozy.
  4. Mt. Tam: I’d be remiss to talk running in the Bay Area and not mention Tam – or Mount Tamalpais. If you park in the Pan Toll parking lot, you can do 15 miles of out and back trails with beautiful views of Stinson Beach & Point Reyes. Your legs will be jello when you are finished, but your heart will be full.
  5. Paradise Loop: I am ending on this route because it was the location of my first ever 20 miler, which is such a special day in any marathon training cycle – whether it be your first or 50th.  I was so nervous, but this route took great care of me. The whole thing is actually 26 miles, but you can make it any distance you choose by doing an out and back, or utilizing the ferry boats in Tiburon. As unglamorous as this sounds, my favorite way to use this route is by parking near the Corte Madera shopping mall. I can run 10 miles to Tiburon, and there is a big hill about 12 miles in that you have to conquer. I felt that it really helped me to feel prepared for Heartbreak Hill in Boston!
  6.  

Check out my playlist of the week:

 

 
We also want to hear your stories. Share your motivation for running in a short story and hashtag #whyirunjaybird on Instagram for a chance to win weekly prizes including earbuds and a chance to be featured on our social channels. We’re inspired by every type of runner, so don’t hesitate to share your passion with us. To the parent that wakes up early before sending their kids off to school, the beginner seeking to finish their first 5k, and the marathoner looking to set a new PR, your passion inspires more people than you’ll ever know. Share your stories with us and #runwild. Find more info about the This Is Why I Run series here.

 

Keep in touch with Jennifer!

This Is Why I Run – Ben Altenes


Share this :   | | |
This Is Why I Run – Ben Altenes

Ben Altenes is a father, photographer, veteran, and trailrunner based in Salt Lake City, UT. Ben has images on permanent exhibit in the U.S. Pentagon and Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington DC. His images are also on display at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO, the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti, Africa and also in the U.S. Embassy’s permanent art collection in Kabul, Afghanistan.

 

 

There will always be tones in my head. A song stuck in my head, a childhood memory and even thoughts of war. Music has been the one thing that has always traveled with me too. From family road trips across Europe as a kid, on plane flights around the world, and foremost on the trails I run throughout the Wasatch front in Utah! Jaybird has helped me take those tones and tunes wherever I am. Running for me has been an essential part of my mental health and exercise routine. Even more so it has been trail running that has allowed me to escape the f*cking machine of the city and stressors that my hustling lifestyle brings.

 

 

“Not being with the men and women I trusted with my life and not fighting alongside of them anymore made me feel lost.”

 

I am a father, photographer, and veteran of the wars in Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq.  After my service with the U.S. Army, which ended in 2003, I returned back to the war zones in the Middle East for another 10 years to perform Diplomatic security for a Government Agency. Throughout all of those years exposed to a level of trauma in war zones, I developed an amount of post-traumatic stress that eventually got the best of me when I made the conscious decision to not return to the Middle East. Not being with the men and women I trusted with my life and not fighting alongside of them anymore made me feel lost. I was struggling with employment, and struggling with my relationship to my spouse and children. At the time, I wasn’t running trails as much as I use to.  I had lost my family and was forced to seek help through the Department of Veterans Affairs as a result.

 

“I knew running and being out on the trail amongst nature was better therapy for me than coming to the VA facility.”

 

 

The VA only helped to a degree, but one thing I learned while talking with my VA counselors was that running and being out on the trail amongst nature was better therapy for me than coming to the VA facility. I returned to the trails immediately after this realization. I began running in new locations that I hadn’t ran in the prior years, and it was the best drug for me times 10 over.  Trail running has allowed me to escape and to also reflect on my life. The trail has brought back some amazing vivid memories both good and bad. It also made me fight through the stressors and cry out my emotions on the trail; leaving those tears to the trails and to nature was the best medicine ever. No one was there to give me their opinion on my matters, or tell me what I should or shouldn’t be doing with my life.

 

“Leaving those tears to the trails and to nature was the best medicine ever.”

 

Trail running has changed my life! The fitness and health aspect of this sport has made me healthier and stronger. It has allowed me to pursue my photography passion by being confident in reaching certain destinations by simply running/hiking into the backcountry. Capturing images and creating a visual journal has been a fun adventure for me. I started capturing images to simply create a visual journal. It later turned into a serious hobby and onto an incredible opportunity to grow my portfolio. Jaybird has been one of my biggest supporters and motivators to keep capturing images, and I am blessed that they sponsor me as a content creator and athlete!

 

 

All of my current favorite local trails bring their own level of exercise. Jamming up the West sides of Grandeur Peak or Mount Olympus are my go to for leg day. It’s mostly vertical and there isn’t a fast point until you head down the mountain. Longer and faster trails like Salt Lake City’s Bonneville Shoreline trail is a personal favorite as it has moderate terrain and elevation ups and downs as it wraps around the city. Other personal favorite running spots take me to some sweet scenic views. Lake Blanche, Desolation Lake, Pfeifferhorn, and Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park just to name a few are all very rewarding.

 

“Music and the ability to listen to it comfortably and effectively while running is so important to me! My playlist or soundtrack I run to can take me into a higher runner’s high.”

 

 

 

The trails may not know about my stressors or the amount of anxiety I bring to them – they let me be me. I bring music to the trails often, and it helps me set a tempo or seriously just lets me dance along the way while my Jaybird Freedoms are playing my list of tunes. Music and the ability to listen to it comfortably and effectively while running is so important to me! My playlist or soundtrack I run to can take me to into a higher runner’s high. I can hear my heartbeat through the headphones and that lets me know I am alive and well and that I can accomplish this journey of life. I use Jaybird Freedoms because listening to music on the trail helps my cadence and motivation to run stronger and farther. I listen to all genres of music. It’s all about the mood or how I want to dance up or down that trail – and the wireless sound quality and comfort are incredible. Before going wireless, the cord would constantly catch on trees and brush, and it would yank my phone out of my pocket or almost tear my ear off. With Jaybirds I don’t have to worry about it.

 

 

 

“Taking my running and fitness to the outdoors and trails has essentially saved my life.”

 

 

Taking my running and fitness to the outdoors and trails has essentially saved my life or at least has saved me from depression. It has allowed me to get my free dose of Vitamin D, breath in some fresh air, capture some awesome pictures, and get some real-life fitness in at the same time. There is something emotionally and physiologically cathartic about sweating out the bad chemicals and replacing them with healthy self-produced chemicals.

 

We also want to hear your stories. Share your motivation for running in a short story and hashtag #whyirunjaybird on Instagram for a chance to win weekly prizes including earbuds and a chance to be featured on our social channels. We’re inspired by every type of runner, so don’t hesitate to share your passion with us. To the parent that wakes up early before sending their kids off to school, the beginner seeking to finish their first 5k, and the marathoner looking to set a new PR, your passion inspires more people than you’ll ever know. Share your stories with us and #runwild. Find more info about the This Is Why I Run series here.

Update Your Jaybird MySound App For A Whole New Experience


Share this :   | | |
Update Your Jaybird MySound App For A Whole New Experience

Listening to music is a personal experience. It sounds different to all of us, and different types of music affect all of us in different ways. But one thing’s for sure, music can pump us up when nothing else can. And if there’s one thing we’ve learned from seeing people interact with our MySound app, it’s that when we find something we really like, we instantly want to share it with everyone around us.

Unique to Jaybird, the MySound app allows users to alter the actual sound of their music on their headphones. By adjusting the lows, mids, and highs with the app, users can create custom sound profiles that play their music in a way that sounds best to them. Thousands of Jaybird users have created custom sound profiles and shared them with other athletes through the app. We love giving you your music, your way, and MySound has been amazing in connecting athletes across the world who share a passion for pushing themselves backed by the power of their music.

 

Running Music

We’ve been testing ways to make the app even better and interactive for a while now, so we’re psyched to tell you about the app’s latest update with a feature we’re adding called Running Music. We’ve now integrated Spotify, so that you can not only share your custom sound profile but you can create, share, and rate playlists through the app! If you’re looking for new music to pump up your run, look no further.

What’s New

The Jaybird MySound app has been renamed the Jaybird app.

We’ve integrated Spotify playlists into the app to give users the ability to explore, listen to, create, share, and rate playlists within the Jaybird community.

Users can browse playlists from several genres created by Jaybird staff, athletes, and fans.

The playlists are broken down into a few sections: Jaybird, Staff Picks, Popular, Newest, and Trending. This allows users to easily find new jams to pump up their next run.

Don’t own a pair of Jaybird headphones? No problem! In an effort to expand the Jaybird community, we made this feature available to anyone. All you need is a free Spotify account to participate.

Now for the fun part, we’re hosting a series of giveaways over the next couple months, and we’ll be giving away a pair of X3 earbuds every 2 weeks until October 1st to the playlist that has the most Likes. So get your friends and family to download the Jaybird app and start stacking up your likes!

*An individual playlist cannot win more than once.

 

Now all you have to do is update, listen, create, share and #runwild!

DOWNLOAD NOW on iOS

DOWNLOAD NOW on Google Play